Wednesday, March 14, 2012

A "c" or Not a "c?" That is the Question


In wrapping up the final edit on the next issue of Casefile Clues, Madaleine asked me about the transcription of a name from the deed referenced above.

I'm uncertain of whether it should be interpreted as McComas or MComas? [The reference to the same name below makes me think the last vowel is an "a."

The spelling of the name in this case is not crucial to the argument or the article, so I'm not inclined to spend a great deal of time on it, but I am curious. Does the writer mean that little flourish to be a "c" or is it just a flourish? He makes similar marks on his "W"s as well. There are no other upper-case "M"s in the document or I would have had a better comparison.  Just a part of the deed is included in this post.



8 comments:

  1. Gotta be a letter of some sort with someone's name.

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  2. Looks like an M just great penmanship

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  3. Looks like just an 'M' to me. Sometimes they didn't write the 'c', as in Daniel M'Naghten of M'Naghten's Rules.

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  4. I see D M Comas, both at the place you indicate and at the bottom. And nicely written, at that.

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  5. Yep, looks like D M Comas to me.

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  6. Let's investigate the entire document and use a bit of deductive reasoning. Having done so, if we look at the capital 'W's interspersed throughout the text, they too have that little curl as the letter concludes, so I believe the name is Nick D M Comas.

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  7. A flourish, if you look at the "W" in the 3rd line it has that same flourish

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  8. Michael, it could be an M followed by an apostrophe, a form that was sometimes used instead of Mc.

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